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Saturday, August 6, 2016

Conclusions and Summary of NSERC 2016 Summer Research

Post #21 of "Today In The AA" series. (~5 minute read)

I find it weird how our brains manage time. From any given frame of reference, a point in the future may seem an endless distance away; that is until we reach said point. Suddenly the gap closes, and it feels as if the two points were one.
Physically, I'm in the same place I was 3 months ago -- positioned at a waiting gate at the Vancouver International Airport. It was on May 4th, exactly 3 months ago, that I departed to Taiwan, and now I shall return home.

Between these two points in time many valuable things have happened...
 I've had
many
different
homes


across Taiwan, and Germany... Where I've met friends...

LOTS of friends
















and learned many valuable  skills.
in robotics, and life 


The time may seem short, but I feel my whole life would end up the same with this perspective.
If I measure time by only a beginning, and an end, the mind ignores the in-between.

What I'm trying to say is I believe it's more valuable to measure life not by how long we live -- but by how much.

I thank Jacky Baltes, my professor/mentor, for providing me with this unique experience.
My gratitude also extends to professor Tu, of NKFUST, and his students for their help with transportation, living accommodation, and assimilation into Taiwanese culture.
Furthermore to David Kung, and the others from the National Taiwan Normal University.
It was also a great pleasure working with Soroush, Sepehr, and my other friends from the Amirkabir University of Technology.

I have no realistic way to list all of the names, and how much I appreciate everyone's support without introducing a cinematic credit sequence... But I am grateful to you all and hope to work with you all again in the future.

This trip was a valuable transition into my academic career, and also into adulthood with a plethora of life skills I'll benefit from.

We'll see where things go from here...

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